Attaching surgical tubing to slingshot posts

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I recently purchased a folding slingshot (or sling shot, however you want to spell it) from Wholesale items from China on eBay.

Yes, I know. The only difference between men and boys is the price of their toys. When I was young we made shanghais. They were made out of a fork of a tree with a piece of shock cord and a vinyl pouch. While looking for something else on eBay one day I found the slingshots and happened to purchase one!

A quick note on quality of the slingshot. It seems strong enough, but the finish on the metal fork and brace is a bit rough. But then again, you don’t want your slingshot to look too nambie-pambie do you?

Apparently there are some Australian states that won’t allow importation of these slingshots. They are sent directly from Hong Kong. The seller posts the slingshot unassembled — that includes the handle not screwed together or band attached — and in two separate boxes a week apart. The seller guarantees delivery, but make sure you purchase using the ‘Australia-only’ slingshot listing.

My understanding though, at least in Queensland, is that slingshots are legally allowed to be sold as long as the rubber sling is not attached to the fork. So I do not believe that I am doing anything illegal, as long as I do not use it as a weapon …

However, it leaves the question of how to attach the surgical tubing used as the sling to the posts on the fork. If you try to just slide the tubing on the posts, it only goes on about 5 mm … and the first time you give it a decent pull, the tubing comes off.

A quick search of the internet reveals that dipping the ends in rubbing alcohol (that does not contain any lotions or glycerin) before sliding the band on the posts is the secret. Leave it to dry for 24 hours before pulling back on the slingshot and the tubing should not come off.

The only readily available brand of rubbing alcohol I could find in Australia was Isocol. The Isocol packaging does not alert you to any additives that may make the band slip off. You still need to give the end of the tubing a good twist to get them on the posts and then need to align them so that the pouch hangs evenly.

Slingshot and Isocol

Slingshot and Isocol

Now for a little target practice …

The usual disclaimer applies.

10 thoughts on “Attaching surgical tubing to slingshot posts

  1. John

    This is another technique I read in a forum

    “Another way to replace the tube bands is to insert a smaller paint brush or phillips screwdriver into the tube and then roll the tube up on the brush or whatever. Then carefully remove the brush, place the rolled up tube on the tip of the slingshot fork and unroll it on to the slingshot. Once it is on, you are ready to shoot. This is a techique that takes some practice but is neat when it works. I have a tool box full of different sized brushes, screwdrivers, etc. This techique was written up (with pictures) in a past issue of Modren Catapultry.”

    http://talk.slingshots.com/forums/showthread.php?s=2a7584a1792ddb40775a75fc9d927bd0&t=93&page=2

    There is also other liquids they talk about using, in the above forum.

    Thanks for the info about the 2 seperate parcels, from the email supplier.
    Maybe I might get one OK, in NSW ?

    Reply
  2. Tyler

    Ohhh Thanks For That!
    I Bought one like that of ebay,
    But Customs Took It,
    I Wasted 20Something Dollars on it to!

    If Only I Bought an Australian Only One! :(

    Reply
  3. Matthew

    There is a video on youtube of how to put the rubber on, could i buy a slingshot from you as i live in NSW and you order another? i will pay above value

    Reply
  4. John

    One can also use spit then let dry for 24 hours.It is also recommended to store the slingshot in the fridge after use to prolong the rubber sling`s life.

    Reply
  5. nublife

    Any slingshot with an arm brace like the one you pictured is Illegal in all states of Australia, the arm brance gives it much more power and potential for harm, thus banned.

    ones without arm braces are fine in some states.

    (I own many slingshots, i live in adelaide.)

    Reply
  6. Lee

    I would like to know if you know where I can buy surgical tubings for slingshots (possibly smaller tubings like 4 or 5mm in diameter) and if they are sold by the meters here in Brisbane Australia.
    Cheers,
    Lee

    Reply

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